Driving & Back Pain

Think back to how your doctor has advised against sitting for extended periods of time. The same caution becomes applicable to sitting in a car for several hours. Doing so can cause back pain due to poor body circulation and, therefore, oxygen loss. Some studies have even shown a direct link between sitting and obesity as the lack of physical activity cannot control your glucose levels and increases risk of diabetes.

Back pain driving

The major problem with service men and women that drive endlessly for work is that they are seated for too long. Vibration from a moving vehicle increases contractions of back muscles, resulting in back pain, and sitting inevitably encourages the body to slouch into a C-shaped posture. Sitting this way can roll the pelvis and create strain inside its ligaments. This strain and, thus, pressure on the intervertebral discs creates a huge amount of discomfort! The curve from slouching also pushes the head forward, and your neck muscles then have to exert more effort to keep the head held up. As one could image, blood flow from the head to the neck and further down the spine becomes restricted and a serious concern for injury.

Common lower back conditions associated with sitting for extended periods of time:

Sciatica

Sciatica arises from the compression of a nerve root in the lower spine. People suffering from the condition experience numbness along the sciatic nerve in the hips, legs, and feet (even the toes!). In younger adolescents, sciatica can occur from various conditions — a lumbar herniated disc or a degenerative disc disease being the most general.

Lumbar Herniated Discs

A common cause of sciatica is a herniated disc. Herniated disks are also called slipped or compressed disks. The disks rupture and irritate nearby nerves as their jelly-like center leaks. The discs function like cushions between the spinal vertebrae and minimize the impact of motion on the spinal column. They rupture when the gel-like center comes out of its external lining and presses on the sciatica nerve roots, causing sciatica or back pain.

Sacroiliitis

Sacroiliitis refers to the inflammation of either one or both of the sacroiliac joints, which are located at the point of contact between the lower spine and the pelvis. Sacroiliitis often results in pain in the lower back and buttocks that radiates down through one or both legs. The affliction can turn worse with continuous standing or climbing staircases. It is commonly seen in conjunction with injury and arthritis.

Simple remedies for reducing back pain while driving:

  • Take a break from driving, or sitting, every three hours
  • Always bend your knees when lifting items from inside to outside of your vehicle to reduce back strain
  • Maintain a proper posture while sitting and driving

If you suffer from back pain and are looking for treatment options, request an appointment here at one of our San Francisco locations.

Treating Muscle Knots With Active Release Technique (ART)

Treating Muscle Knots With Active Release Technique (ART)

Active Release Technique (ART) is one reliable and universal way that chiropractors relieve patients of their pain through working out muscle knots. ART treatment is comparable to a deep tissue massage that breaks up adhesions and scar tissue in the soft tissues of the affected area. This technique is especially popular amongst athletes for performance and sports injuries because of its ability to target and respond to different severities and locations of the muscle adhesion or scar tissue.

How does Active Release Technique work?

When using ART, a chiropractor will begin by applying manual tension on a muscle to shorten it. The client being treated then actively lengthens the muscles by making sure that the muscle tension is held in place. The treatment may cause some initial discomfort, but it provides your body with the necessary relaxation and stretch to work through painful knots.
The main goal of an ART is to reduce fibrous adhesions while reestablishing the motions between fascia and muscles. ART creates tension on a scar tissue, which is a fibrous material created by our body to bind and connect injured tissue. However, scar tissue can sometimes bind surrounding structures, which will cause a muscle to become entrapped, pulled, and pinched under that adhesion. Even nerves can get trapped within the muscle and lead to more severe pain and associated symptoms. ART targets the injured soft tissue and restores its normal function before more painful and worrisome consequences arise.

You might consider ART a massage technique, but it is a lot more than that! A professional chiropractor follows 500 specific protocols, after becoming certified, to provide you relief through ART.

How is Active Release Technique different from other techniques?

ART technique is based on the active participation of the patient. A client will move an affected part of the body while a chiropractor presses the injured area. It is this collaboration that allows a chiropractor to feel the affected ligament or muscle as it moves under their contact.

What all can Active Release Technique treat?

ART treatment is highly effective in treating carpal tunnel syndrome, shin splints, shoulder pain, back pain, knee problems, sciatica, plantar fasciitis, tennis elbow, and a number of others conditions that are a result of overused muscles.

What should I expect in an Active Release Technique session?

An ART session is a great balance between examination and treatment. While providing the ART technique, your chiropractor might use their hands to analyze the affected area in terms of tightness, texture, movement of muscles, nerves, tendons, and ligaments.

How to get Active Release Technique therapy?

Treating Muscle Knots With Active Release Technique (ART)

It is highly recommended to book your ART session only with licensed chiropractors, massage therapists, and doctors who have recent certifications in ART. A bonus to ART therapy is that it does not require any prescription, and you can easily get it by making an appointment with a certified ART provider. To book an appointment with us at one of our San Francisco Bay Area clinics, click here.

 

Pilates for a Healthy Spine: How Pilates Relates to Your Chiropractic Health

Pilates for Chiropractic Health

Guest blog post by: Maiden Lane Studios

“You are only as young as your spine is flexible.” ~Joseph Pilates

Over the years the Pilates Method of exercise has become synonymous for not only toning and shaping dancer like bodies, but also easing back pain and preventing injuries. So, there are many obvious connections to your chiropractic healthcare. Many times the phrase “core strength” gets used to describe the method of movement because there is a major focus on building strength from the center of the body. Similarly, this is a term you will often hear your chiropractor use in treatment.

There is a direct link between spine health and core strength, but first let’s dive into what the core actually is.

The core is not just about abdominal muscles or having a “6-pack.” The core comprises a group of muscles in the body that should be equally balanced and strong. These muscles are: the rectus abdominis, the transverse abdominals, the obliques, the low back extensors, and the glute muscles. Essentially, the core is just about everything except the arms, legs, and head.

Pilates for Chiropractic Health

Pilates is a system of exercises that focuses on building strength from the core first. It places emphasis on working around what is called “neutral spinal alignment,” basically meaning that the anatomical correct alignment of the spine is the main focus on where strength is developed. This helps with the awareness of posture and how we sit and stand. When strength is built from this alignment, improperly overloading the joints with body weight (commonly seen in the low back) is significantly reduced, which helps to alleviate pain and the potential for future injury. As you can see, there are many similarities between the benefits and goals of Pilates and chiropractic work. There is also a focus on syncing the breath with movement that helps to develop a deeper mind to body connection and better body awareness.

Whether back pain or stiffness is present, or if you are looking to prevent the onset of injury, Pilates is a great option for exercise. If you are in the San Francisco area, consider checking out Maiden Lane Studios. Or, if you are ready to add massage or chiropractic care to your treatment regime, please get in touch to schedule an appointment with SF Custom Chiro.

The Importance of Proper Posture: Top Bay Area Chiropractor Explains Why It Matters

Ever wonder why proper posture is so important? San Francisco chiropractor, Dr. Adam Jacobs, explains how correct spinal posture can prevent a variety of potential problems and improve your overall health.

Let’s admit that we all are guilty of neglecting the importance of good posture in our overall health, time and time again! We all are repetitively at fault when sitting in an office chair, sleeping and so on. While the side effects may not be visible initially, a bad posture definitely takes a toll on our overall health.

Proper posture is as important as eating a nutritious diet. In fact, at our San Francisco chiropractic offices, we often tell our patients that perfect posture trains your body to place the least strain on supporting muscles and ligaments during movements or daily activities. It helps maintain the wellness of the nervous system and the spine.

Why having a proper posture is so necessary?

Besides presenting a good appearance, there are various advantages of a good posture. These are:

  •         Prevents the spine from getting fixed or stuck in abnormal positions.
  •         Lowers the stress on the ligaments that holds the spinal joints together
  •         Maintains the correct alignment of the bones plus joints for the proper use of muscles and nervous system
  •         Reduces the abnormal wearing of the surfaces of joints that may cause arthritis.
  •         Prevents backaches as well as muscular pain
  •         Opens up the lungs for allowing more oxygen supply inside the body that moves into the muscle and brain cells and augments your overall energy level.

Keeping a good posture means maintaining an alignment of every body part with its adjacent parts. A proper posture restores the balance and support of all parts. When standing, your exact standing posture should look similar to sketching a straight line from the earlobe, over the shoulder, knee, hip and right into the middle of the ankle.

However, what actually happens if you fail to flaunt a proper posture? Let’s find out.

How bad posture might interfere with your health?

One of the most serious problems involving bad posture can be developing a kyphosis or scoliosis spinal curvature which slowly impacts the spine to alter its normal positions. The human spine has four natural curves that create an “S” shape in the coronal plane. Too much curve in the mid back can lead to a condition called hyperkyphosis, or a buffalo hump.  Too much curve laterally in the sagittal plane can lead to scoliosis. Since bad posture alters the spinal alignment, the resulting motions are negatively affected leading to subluxations that result in less blood supply and altered nervous system response. 

Bad posture leads to serious problems within the skeletal system as skeletons are the support system of our entire body. Slouching or slanted postures lead to rib compression and curving of the spine. The rigidity of the rib cage makes your lungs to not expand fully. This leads to a lack of oxygen supply that impacts your entire body’s systems.

The cervical spine or neck tends to feel the burden from bad posture first. Neck pain leads to tension that radiates lower to the shoulders and upwards causing headaches. Our muscular system works in tandem with the skeletal system to facilitate movement and posture. It helps us to maintain our body positions against the force of gravity and allows us to generate movements.

·         Posture and your digestive system

Ever thought that a bad posture can impact your digestive system? Well, yes, it can! An imperfect posture accompanied by a lack of exercise and, in some instances, obesity can weaken the stomach muscles that generally hold the pelvis in its exact position. Weak muscles denote that the pelvis is tilted forward which aggravates poor posture and causes pain while standing erect.

An abnormal slouched posture has been found to be a contributing factor to digestive issues like acid reflux or hernias. The most convenient way to strengthen the abdominal muscles and provide back support is through perfect posture.

·         Posture and your cardiovascular health

Your breathing becomes easier and deeper with good posture. You will feel less fatigued as a good posture gives you higher oxygen levels and greater energy boost.

With all that being said, how would you know what a proper posture is? Let’s find out.

 

How should the proper posture look like?

·         The proper sitting posture

A good sitting posture comprises of an erect spine and head with the maintenance of the three natural back curves. A slumped sitting posture and a slouched position with head forward reflect a bad posture.

While sitting in an office chair, keep your back aligned against the office chair back. For lengthy sitting make sure that the chair is ergonomically crafted to provide back support and is custom fit. We also recommend Intelliskin (which can be purchase through our shop page) if you find it hard to have good posture on your own while sitting at your desk.

·         The proper standing posture

Always stand with your weight placed mostly on the balls of your feet and not on the heels. It is highly recommended to position your feet slightly apart, approximately at shoulder-width. Let your arms hang naturally down adjacent to your body. Always stand straight and tall with your shoulders upright and refrain from locking the knees.

Tuck a bit your chin to maintain the head level and make sure that the head is square above the spine and not pushed out ahead. If you are standing for a lengthy period, then rotate your weight from one foot to the other or move from heels to toes. While standing it is important to keep your ears, shoulders, hips, and ankles in a vertical line. Generally, by raising your chin up you help to resolve standing postural problems.

·         The best posture for your knees

A proper knee posture safeguards your thigh and lower leg bones. While sitting keep your knees bent at a right angle slightly above than the hips. Your ankles should be placed slightly ahead of your knees. While driving also, your knees should be slightly higher compared to your hips.

How to determine if you have a good posture?

Simply, have a self-examination called ‘mirror exam.’ Stand in front of a full-length mirror and observe whether:

  •         Your shoulders are at level and your head is straight.
  •         Your hips are level and your kneecaps face directly ahead and you have straight ankles.
  •         Also, see that the spaces between your arms and side appear equal.
  •         Ideally aligned feet and ankles would face forward instead of turning inward or outward.

 

Various integrative therapies are also employed to reduce pain through healthy posturing. The Gokhale method created by Esther Gokhale employs the procedure of perfect posture and movement to eradicate back, muscle or joint pain and return back to a pain-free life.  It also helps you to tackle muscle and joint degeneration and augments your stamina and flexibility. The tools help you to regain your natural posture.

Over to You – Is it times to schedule an appointment with a local San Francisco chiropractor?

We hope that the above-mentioned points were successful in letting you know the importance of a good posture. It is thus highly recommended to visit a chiropractor if you spot any posture issues.  If you are in the greater San Francisco Bay Area and would like to book and appointment with one of our specialists, contact us here .

The Impact of Standing Desks

San Fransisco, CA

How to enhance the health and wellness of employees at the workplace is an ongoing subject of debate. Some discussions consider whether or not a particular organization should invest in corporate wellness programs to boost productivity while others think about specific mechanisms in the workplace, such as standing versus sitting desks.

Recent studies have shown that reducing sitting time to 3 hours each day can increase the American lifespan by two years. There is now a wide variety of modern ergonomic desks that are adjustable so employees can easily go from standing to sitting in a matter of seconds. While it’s not even ideal to only stand throughout the day, keeping a 70/30 ratio between standing and sitting has been shown to decrease risk associated with obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and premature death.

Is It Worth Standing For? 

The Advantages of Standing Desks

  •        Weight loss

You can burn up to 1,000 calories from standing at your desk for a few hours every afternoon in a week. Studies have also indicated that using a standing desk while working can reduce blood sugar spikes, especially after lunch.

  •        Improves your heart health

The greater the time spent on sitting, the more likely it is to develop the risk of heart disease.

  •        Reduces back discomfort

Participants in a recent study experienced 32% relief from lower back pain after using standing desks for several weeks. A similar study reported by the CDC detected a 54% reduction in upper back and neck pain after four weeks by using a modern sit-stand desk.

  •        Boosts your energy levels

A seven-week study conducted on participants working on standing desks revealed less fatigue and stress compared to those sitting for the entire work period. 87% of people using standing desks noted greater vigor and stamina throughout the day.

  •        Enhances productivity

A study was conducted on 60 young office workers who were asked to use a standing desk for four hours. There was no shown impact of standing on typing errors or speed.

Texas Health Science Center even measured the productivity of people using sitting desks over 6 months and found that employees who used standing desks were more productive than the people who were sitting at their desks.

  •        Proper Ergonomics

Let’s not forget proper ergonomics. Both feet should be grounded on the floor, monitor should be eye level, keyboard and mouse should be close to the body and at an angle below or equal to 90*.  An anti fatigue mat is a great tool to to add to the work set up as well.  

Here are a few standing desks we recommend: 

Proven Ways To Get Rid Of Muscle Knots

San Fransisco, CA.

Let’s admit; we all are guilty of sitting in front of our computer in the same position for hours, chronically dehydrated and stiff. And that’s when we start feeling tension in our shoulder and neck muscles. Ever wondered why?

Well, this is because of the fact that our muscles get overworked, tangled and are unable to relax. As a result, the muscle fibers become lumpy, have lack of oxygen and nutrition and form a muscle knot. Needless to say, if you have ever formed muscle knots, they are extremely painful. Occasionally, muscle knots go away on their own, but in most cases, proper steps should be adopted in order to loosen the tense muscles and relieve the pain. Let’s have a quick insight on how to prevent muscle knots from developing in the first place. As they say an ounce of prevention is worth a pound in cure.

How To Prevent Muscle Knots From Developing?

1. Eating right

Being dehydrated might be a major cause behind the muscle knots. You should be drinking7-9 glasses of water, but if you are experiencing frequent muscle knots, it could mean that your body is not getting enough water. Achieve your body’s water requirements by carrying a water bottle with you, or by setting a reminder on your phone that will notify you to gulp a glass of water every hour.

Furthermore, maintain a safe distance with coffee and alcohol as they tend to dehydrate you, so it is important to include an additional glass of water every time you consume any of them. Further, it is highly recommended to include calcium, magnesium, and potassium in your diet. These minerals are essential for muscle health and relaxation.  Deficiency of any of these can cause painful muscle cramps, knots, and stiffness. Intake of fresh, organic fruits and vegetables is always recommended.

2. Keep moving

Avoid sitting in the same position for too long whether it is while you are reading, playing games on your phone and so on. It is important to get up and walk around every hour at work. Even while seated at your desk, make small movements like turning your neck from side to side, straightening out your back, uncrossing the legs and the likes. This can go a long way in preventing muscle knots.

3. Exercise regularly

Our bodies are built to perform. Various day to day movements like moving, lifting and stretching keep our muscles healthy and flexible. Exercising regularly works by releasing tension from the muscles if any. It is highly suggested to keep at least 30 minutes for light exercises and stretching every day.

4. Improve your posture

Just like sitting in one position for too long is not good, slouching at a desk or in front of the television is bad for your muscles too. Keep your posture right, sit in a way that the muscles are not strained and blood flow is not blocked. Keep your head upright and your back straight. Slouching or hunching your back can cause stress to the muscles of the back and lead to pain. Keeping a good neutral posture will help in preventing muscle knots and cramps.

However, if the other preventive measures have not worked for you please call your local chiropractor, or massage therapist.  For more information, please call at 415-788-8700 or book an appointment here.

Treating Muscle Knots: Advice from San Francisco’s Leading Chiropractors

San Francisco, CA

In this day in age of over work, over stressed, poor posture humans it is an anomaly to find someone that doesn’t have muscle knots rather than finding someone that does. Luckily there are effective ways to treating them and most of these tried and true ways can be achieved at a SF Custom Chiropractic location.  

If you do have a painful muscle knot or any kind of stiffness, here are a few ways in which it can be treated.

1. Massage

Massage is not only an occasional luxury that you need to save for your vacations or spa but is also a therapy in itself. Massage therapy can help a lot in treating muscle knots. A good masseuse will know how to deal with areas of tension and muscle knots by applying the right amount of direct pressure on the grain of the muscle till the knot is located. Once the muscle is isolated, it is massaged outwards from the knot till it is broken down.

2. Active release technique

Treating muscle knots using the gold standard active release technique is another reliable way that chiropractors around the world help patients feel better. ART treatment is like a deep tissue massage with motion which works by breaking up adhesions in the soft tissues of the affected area. This technique is very popular amongst athletes for performance and sports injuries. Each ART session is specially customized depending on the severity and location of the muscle knot.

3. Heat

Heat increases the flow of blood in the affected area. It may also reduce the pain and muscle tension by helping you relax. Taking a hot shower for a few minutes, or using a hot pack to treat the muscle knot can help you in fetching quick relief. Place a towel between your skin and the hot pack in order to prevent your skin from burning. Heat therapy can be used three to five times a day till the knot disappears. It can definitely give you temporary relief in acute cases.

4. Stretching

Gentle stretches can help in reducing muscle tension and pain from pulled muscles or knots. Stretching keeps the muscles pliable. Including stretching in your daily routine can prevent muscle knots. Yoga or tai chi combines exercise with stretching. To treat muscle knots, one could practice this for an hour every day.

5. Heat and ice

Contrast therapy can also help you in fetching relief from muscle knots. A heating pad or cold compress can ease some of the pain that comes with muscle knots. It is important to use a cooling spray in coordination with stretching. Start with cold for 10 minutes then use heat for 10 minutes and finish with cold for 10 minutes. Never put ice or hot packs directly on the skin.

If you you like to try any of these treatments for your muscle knots, feel free to give us a call at 415-788-8700 or book an appointment here.

 

5 Yoga Poses for Upper Back and Neck Pain

Blog Contributor: Colleen Bolland

https://www.movewith.com/ColleenApril

moxi.yoga

Does this look familiar?!

If you’re like neck shoulder painmost Americans, you suffer from some form of back pain. And, if your job requires you to sit at a desk throughout the day, chances are that you’re feeling it all over. There is a lot of accessible information online for treating lower back pain, but what do you do about the burn in your neck and shoulders? Below are five simple yoga poses that you can do almost anywhere to help relieve upper back and neck pain.

cow face pose

  1. Cow Face Pose (Arms Only):

Reach your right arm up, palm facing forward, and reach your left hand down, palm facing backward. Bend both arms at the elbow, the right arm bent behind your head to find your left between your shoulder blades. If your hands cannot meet, grab onto your shirt for the stretch. Breathe deeply, lift your chest, and sit up tall (try not to tuck your chin). Stay in this position for 5-7 long breathes.

  1. Eagle Pose (Arms Only):eagle pose

Extend both arms straight out from the shoulders, parallel with the floor. Cross your right arm over your left, and bend both, hinging the elbows. From here, you can place your hands on your shoulders if you’re already feeling a stretch. You can also extend your hands toward the ceiling, and cross the left wrist over the right to place your hands together. Hold this position for 5-7 breathes.

  1. Cat Pose & Cow Pose:cat pose

Come to all fours. Stack your wrists under your shoulders and your knees below your hips. Using your breath to guide your movement, inhale, and draw your shoulder blades together. Lift your chest and chin, and relax your belly. Next, exhale, and tuck your chin. Round your shoulders to spread your shoulder blades, and round your upper back. Move through 8-10 rounds of breath (each pose 4-5 times).

  1. Supported Fish Pose:

If you don’t have a yoga block, you can use a towel or blanket, rolled up tightly. Let the top of the block or towel rest just under the base of the skull so your head drapes over the top. Use your forearms and hands to support supported fish poseyourself. Relax, and take 7-10 deep breaths in this posture while letting your head hang heavily.

 

This routine only takes five minutes of your day yet can make a difference worth a lifetime.

 

Common Injuries for Triathletes

 

Triathlete Injuries SWIM:

Rotator cuff strain or impingement: Pain on the front or outside of the arm. Common found with repetitive overhead activities (swimming). The group of four muscles mainly responsible for stabilization of the shoulder is collectively called the rotator cuff. Impingement = compression of the rotator cuff tendons between the bones of the shoulder.

BIKE/RUN:

Cervical Strain: Pain at base of skull or along sides of neck. Common with biking because of prolonged extension – May need to have bike fit assessed or posture on bike- use eyes more than neck to look ahead. Frequent stretching helps.

Lumbar Strain/pain: Pain around lower back. May be due to tightness, weak abs, or improper positioning on the bike. Seek medical attention if pain radiates down leg or if you have numbness/tingling.

Patellofemoral Syndrome: Pain in front of the knee or under the kneecap. Can feel pain running, biking, and descending stairs or with prolonged sitting or squatting. Can be caused by anatomic malalignment, poor bike fit or strength imbalances and tightness.

Patellar Tendinitis: Pain below the kneecap. Usually aggravated by jumping and mid to full squat. May feel pain with biking/running. Often associated with decreased quad strength and can co-exist with patellofemoral syndrome.

Hamstring tears or strains: Can occur with running or cycling. Usually caused by tight hamstrings due to overtraining or muscle imbalances. Pain can be sharp and persistent. Gentle stretching, massage, ice for acute injury.

RUN:

Achilles Tendinitis: May have pain, swelling and tenderness to touch at heel cord. Can be due to calf weakness or tightness, poor footwear, overtraining (running) will affect running and possibly cycling.

ITB Syndrome: ITB is a fibrous band that runs down the side of the leg from the hip to the knee. Usually pain is localized to the outside of the thigh, just above the knee and is sharp/stabbing. If the band becomes tight it rubs over bony areas and causes irritation and pain. Pain can be with running or bending the knee with cycling.

Plantar Fasciitis: Pain in heel and can be along the arch. Worst first thing in a.m. Common with pronated feet (low arches) and aggravated by walking/running. May need orthotics or motion control shoes.
Shin Splints: Pain, tenderness, and mild swelling next to the medial (inside) lower half of the tibia (shin bone). Common with overpronators, running on hard/slanted surfaces, or downhill, worn out or inappropriate footwear, tight calves.

All the doctors at SF Custom Chiropractic are sports chiropractors and can always help assist you with your healing process with injuries. Just give us a call to find out more 415.788.8700!

Meet Dr. Mike Grossman!

Dr. Mike Grossman

WHY CHIROPRACTIC?

Dr. Michael Grossman’s passion for chiropractic began when he suffered a neck injury at the age of 16, falling off his bike, leaving him in agonizing pain for weeks. He had difficulty with sleep and performing his daily activities, until he decided to try chiropractic care. After a few treatment visits he was able to achieve a restful nights sleep and could function in his everyday life without pain. This was the spark that lead to his chiropractic career. Dr. Grossman attended San Jose State University graduating with a degree in Kinesiology and a minor in Complimentary and Alternative Health. After graduating he attended Palmer College of Chiropractic West located in San Jose, CA. While attending chiropractic school he was involved with the sports council working events such as the Sea Otter Classic and Turkey Trot. He also participated in clinic aboard traveling to El Salvador and Fiji delivering chiropractic care to impoverished areas that had poor access to health care. He performed his internship at SF Custom Chiropractic facilitating patient care. Following his internship he was hired on as an associate doctor at SF Custom Chiropractic. Dr. Grossman is certified in Applied Kinesiology, Sacral Occipital Technique, full body Active Release Technique, Fascial Movement Taping, and Tecnica Gavilan. He resides in Cupertino, CA where he takes advantage of the beautiful Bay Area outdoors engaging in activities from camping, biking, hiking, and music festival events.

EDUCATION

Dr. Grossman attended San Jose State University and received his undergraduate degree in Kinesiology with a minor in Complimentary and Alternative Medicine. He attended Palmer College of Chiropractic West for graduate school in San Jose, CA.

A LIFELONG LEARNER

Dr. Grossman is certified in Full Body Active Release Technique, Sacral Occipital Technique, Applied Kinesiology, and Fascial Movement Taping.

INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY

Dr. Grossman has contributed to the community delivering chiropractic care to outreach facilities in San Jose. He also delivers talks on chiropractic care and the benefits at local boot camps, schools, and sporting events.